Events

May 22
Black Joy Sessions: Finding Joy Within 1:00 p.m.

Black students, faculty members, and staff are invited to engage in activities that center Black joy including art, laughter, music, and movement. Black Joy Sessions create a...
Black Joy Sessions: Finding Joy Within
April 10–June 5
1:00–2:00 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Black students, faculty members, and staff are invited to engage in activities that center Black joy including art, laughter, music, and movement. Black Joy Sessions create a space to center a celebration of Black culture, uplift, heal, and empower using a liberated narrative of the Black experience. This space is designed to be an easy, transformative, and love-infused space to create, express, and (re)claim Black joy.

May 22
Let's Talk Drop-In - Wednesdays 2-4PM @ BCC 2:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, at the Black Cultural Center. Let’s Talk is a service...
Let's Talk Drop-In - Wednesdays 2-4PM @ BCC
April 10–June 12
2:00–4:00 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, at the Black Cultural Center.

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a CS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our CS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s Talk work?

Let’s Talk will be offered via Zoom and/or in satellite locations across campus. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

 

 

 

 

 

May 22
Moira Fradinger. Speaker Series: Mafia, The Cultures of Narcotraffic. 5:00 p.m.

Moira Fradinger, Yale University, will be talking about the uses of Antigona in literary representations of violence in authoritarian settings. Students will be reading the...
Moira Fradinger. Speaker Series: Mafia, The Cultures of Narcotraffic.
May 22
5:00–6:30 p.m.

Moira Fradinger, Yale University, will be talking about the uses of Antigona in literary representations of violence in authoritarian settings. Students will be reading the performative poetry collection Antígona González as part of the Spanish 490 and RL623 seminars and Speaker Series: "Mafias and the Cultures of Narcotraffic." 

May 22
Speaker Series: Mafias and the Cultures of Narcotraffic 5:00 p.m.

This term-long colloquium (RL623) looks at the ways in which disposable bodies and violence are fast becoming a cultural currency associated with the kingpin culture of...
Speaker Series: Mafias and the Cultures of Narcotraffic
April 17–June 5
5:00 p.m.–6:30 a.m.

This term-long colloquium (RL623) looks at the ways in which disposable bodies and violence are fast becoming a cultural currency associated with the kingpin culture of narcotraffic. This is a key debate for which the humanities and the social sciences are very well positioned to encourage critical thinking of the consumer culture (both Netflix shows, as well as drug consumerism) undergirding the glamorization of narcotraffic. This program includes the Film Series on Monday evenings (GSH123 6-8.30pm) and various speakers on different Wednesday evenings (5-6.30pm), as a way to engage with pressing issues of human rights, globalization, and global health. These cultural texts need to be critically accessed through a humanistic inquiry into the production of networks of cultural representations that endorse honor codes, impunity, naturalized political corruption, and the (de)valorization of the human body, all part of the glorification of narcotraffic, itself an epitome of capitalist accumulation and neoliberal deregulation.

May 22
Cintia Martínez Velasco. Speaker Series. Mafia: The Cultures of Narcotraffic. 6:30 p.m.

Assistant Professor in Philosophy, UO, Cintia Martínez Velasco will be talking about Femicide as Genocide. Students will be reading Sergio González...
Cintia Martínez Velasco. Speaker Series. Mafia: The Cultures of Narcotraffic.
May 22
6:30–8:00 p.m.
Fenton Hall 110

Assistant Professor in Philosophy, UO, Cintia Martínez Velasco will be talking about Femicide as Genocide. Students will be reading Sergio González Rodríguez' The Femicide Machine as part of the Spanish 490 and RL623 seminars and Speaker Series: "Mafias and the Cultures of Narcotraffic." 

May 22
Reading Series - Maurice Ruffin 7:00 p.m.

Maurice Carlos Ruffin’s most recent book is The American Daughters (One World, 2024), which Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, called “a vibrant picture of...
Reading Series - Maurice Ruffin
May 22
7:00–8:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room

Maurice Carlos Ruffin’s most recent book is The American Daughters (One World, 2024), which Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, called “a vibrant picture of antebellum New Orleans.” He is also the author of the story collection The Ones Who Don’t Say They Love You (One World, 2021), which was a New York Times Editors’ Choice, a finalist for the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, and longlisted for the Story Prize. His first book, We Cast a Shadow (One World, 2019), was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and the PEN America Open Book Prize. It was a New York Times Editors’ Choice and was longlisted for the 2021 DUBLIN Literary Award, the Center for Fiction Prize, and the Aspen Words Literary Prize. Ruffin is the winner of several literary prizes, including the Iowa Review Award in fiction and the William Faulkner–William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition Award for Novel-in-Progress. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the LA Times, the Oxford American, Garden & Gun, Kenyon Review, and Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America. A New Orleans native, Ruffin is a professor of Creative Writing at Louisiana State University.

May 23
Undergraduate Research Symposium 9:00 a.m.

During the Undergraduate Research Symposium on May 23, students from all disciplines, majors, and colleges come together on campus to share the projects and interests...
Undergraduate Research Symposium
May 23
9:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.

During the Undergraduate Research Symposium on May 23, students from all disciplines, majors, and colleges come together on campus to share the projects and interests they’re passionate about.

Students will present research, creative projects, works-in-progress, etc. in a variety of formats and media. We hope you’ll join us!

May 23
¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group 1:30 p.m.

¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group is a drop-in processing and support space for Latinx students to share information and develop skills to tackle challenging situations such as...
¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group
April 11–June 13
1:30–2:30 p.m.
Carson Hall, Ramey Room

¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group is a drop-in processing and support space for Latinx students to share information and develop skills to tackle challenging situations such as academic stress, family challenges, self-worth, relationships, mental health concerns, and much more. Group members will be able to work through their presenting concerns, find community, and be empowered in a protected therapy space.

May 23
"Jobs and Universities: A Tale of Two Futures" 4:00 p.m.

Public disappointment with universities has reached epidemic proportions, and a common complaint is that they do a poor job of preparing students to find a job, especially given...
"Jobs and Universities: A Tale of Two Futures"
May 23
4:00 p.m.

Public disappointment with universities has reached epidemic proportions, and a common complaint is that they do a poor job of preparing students to find a job, especially given how much they cost.  In this talk, Newfield agrees with the critics that universities are ineffective job training programs. He also explains that this is not what universities do.  While a B.A. clearly helps graduates get good jobs, the focus on jobs has perversely hurt the educational core that allows this—intensive learning of complex knowledge in a range of situations and fields. Business and government should be held responsible for employment, and universities held responsible for learning. The partnership between society and higher education needs a radical overhaul, and Newfield suggests why universities need to focus on solving the world’s enormously difficult problems, and how they can best educated people to do this.

Christopher Newfield was Distinguished Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara and is now Director of Research at the Independent Social Research Foundation in London. He is immediate past president of the Modern Language Association. A multidisciplinary scholar, his areas of research are Critical University Studies, literary criticism, quantification studies, innovation studies, and the intellectual and social effects of the humanities. He has recently published two books on the metrics of higher education: Metrics That Matter: Counting What’s Really Important to College Students (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2023) and The Limits of the Numerical: The Abuses and Uses of Quantification (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2022).

Please register.

May 23
Cinema Studies Presents: Screening of "Race to Survive: New Zealand” and Q&A with Emmy Award-winning Television Series Producer Jeff Conroy 7:00 p.m.

Join Cinema Studies and series Producer Jeff Conroy for a screening of the premiere episode of Season 2’s “Race to Survive: New Zealand” followed by a...
Cinema Studies Presents: Screening of "Race to Survive: New Zealand” and Q&A with Emmy Award-winning Television Series Producer Jeff Conroy
May 23
7:00–9:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

Join Cinema Studies and series Producer Jeff Conroy for a screening of the premiere episode of Season 2’s “Race to Survive: New Zealand” followed by a Q&A and reception with the producer.  Free and open to the UO community.

Jeff Conroy is an award-winning television producer (including 3 Emmys) on 1,500+ episodes and 50 television series across 15 different networks. Notable projects include hit shows "Deadliest Catch," "Axmen," "Ice Road Truckers," "Bering Sea Gold," "Storage Wars" and Jay Leno’s "Garage." He’s the current showrunner for USA Networks adventure competition series "Race to Survive: New Zealand" which premieres in May of 2024.

This event is part of the 2024 Art of Producing Visiting Filmmaker Series, featuring screenings, talks, and receptions with award-winning producers and filmmakers. All events are free and open to the UO community.

Visit the Cinema Studies website for more information on this event and others in the series: https://cinema.uoregon.edu/faculty-news-news/art-producing-visiting-filmmaker-series-2024. 

Funded by the generous Harlan J. Strauss Visiting Filmmaker Endowment